Tblisi

Have you been to a city where you can find Georgian Orthodox, and Roman Catholic churches, a synagogue, a mosque and a Zoroastrian temple all within a 5-minute walk of each other? Then you should definitely come to Georgia and visit our capital Tbilisi – a multi-ethnic, multi-cultural, multi-religious city on the crossroads of history, a city neither European nor Asian but a heady blend of both East and West. Tbilisi was founded in the 5th century AD and has attracted visitors ever since, drawn by the hot springs for which the city is named, by the lively atmosphere of its cobbled streets and caravanserais or simply by what Alexandre Dumas called the “strange, fascinating charm” of this “city of legend and romance.”

Places to visit


 

Old Town

Sitting at the foot of the imposing hill capped by the Narikala Fortress and climbing the slopes is Tbilisi Old Town, a labyrinth of narrow streets where wooden balconies look down from old brick-built homes. Parts have been comprehensively renovated, arguably a little too enthusiastically, so that some streets look like a Disney film set, though far more of these twisting alleys are untouched. The style is a mix of two influences, the tight winding streets of an Asian or Arabic town interwoven with European, classical Russian and Art Nouveau architecture. The northern edge is the recently renovated Abanotubani area, famous for its Sulphur Baths and Meidani square with its many restaurants.

Puppet Theatre

Though modest in size, The Gabriadze Theater is among the world’s preeminent cultural institutions. Presenting mature puppet performances full of depth and meaning, it has gained the respect and recognition of international audiences and critics alike.

Anchiskhati church

In the Old Town, there is the ancient acting St. Mary Church constructed during the reign of Dacha Udzharmeli, the successor of Vakhtang Gorgasali, in the 4th century. The beautiful rectangular building of the church was built under the influence of ancient Palestinian architecture. The doors of Anchiskhati church are decorated with traditional Georgian cross similar to the one made by St. Nino. On the western facade of the temple, there is a stone medallion with the cross which has survived since the earliest version. The upper parts and arches were reconstructed in the 17 th – 19 th centuries.

The Bridge of Peace

Relatively newly constructed the Bridge of Peace is definitely the attraction one wouldn’t want to miss in Tbilisi. It is a pedestrian glass and steel bridge in a bow-shaped design that sits over the Mtkvari (Kura) river in the Georgian capital. It was officially opened in May 2010. The bridge was brought to Georgia from Italy in 200 unassembled components. The bridge is 156 meters long and has more than 10 000 LED bulbs built-in, that is switched on daily 90 minutes before the sunset. 
The Bridge of Peace is a convenient cross point between Rike Park and the ‘old’ part of the town. It also provides amazing views of Tbilisi, especially at sunrise, sunset or night.
In 2012 the Bridge of Piece in Tbilisi hit the Top-13 most unusual bridges in the world.

Rike Park

Rike park is considered to be the youngest recreational area in Tbilisi. It is situated on the left bank of the river Kura (Mtkvari) and already has become a popular place for both local and international visitors, especially families, and in summer. The Rike park is quite easy to find, as its main entrance is right from the beautiful pedestrian ‘Bridge of Peace’. The park is a host to numerous entertainment facilities like singing and dancing fountains, artificial climbing wall, children’s maze, mega-chess board, as well as footpaths and quiet corners. The start point of a newly opened cable car that takes visitors up to Narikala fortress is located in the Rike park, as well as a number of fancy bars and restaurants.

Narikala fortress

The Holy Mountain Mtatsminda hosts the fragments of ancient Narikala fortress. It is the most known and ancient monument of Tbilisi ‘s antiquity; the townspeople call it “the heart and soul of the city”. The date of construction of the fortress is the 4 th century AD, i.e. it has been there from the city’s beginning. 
The fortress territory contains St. Nicolas temple dated the 12 th century. The temple was reconstructed in 1996 in the traditions of the fortress surrounding it. The internal part is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and the history of Georgia.

Leghvtakhevi Waterfall

Leghvtakhevi – ‘fig gorge’, in Georgian – is located behind Tbilisi’s renowned Sulphur Baths. Formerly accessible only from within the Botanic Garden, this beautiful waterfall and watering hole for locals is now reachable through a series of paths and bridges behind the baths. A popular location to relax and stroll about especially at night or during hot weekend days, make sure to check out this ancient spot in the centre of Tbilisi after a large meal or to escape the mid-afternoon heat.

Abanotubani – Bath District

The Abanotubani is the name given to the district in the Old Town of Tbilisi where there is a whole street (Abanos kucha) of public bathhouses that use the sulphurous waters of the many hot springs in this area.
Abanotubani is the place, where according to legend, King Vakhtang Gorgasali’s falcon fell, leading to the discovery of the hot springs and, subsequently the founding of a new capital.
The bathhouses are located below ground level with only beehive-like domes visible on the surface

Mtatsminda Park

Mtatsminda is the mountain topped by the 210m-high TV mast that overlooks central Tbilisi. Located 800-meters above the city Mtatsminda Park (known as Bombora) spread over more than 1 sq km and has been a popular fun spot for generations. In the days of the Soviet Union, Mtatsminda Park was the third most visited public park in the USSR, Gorky Park in Moscow being number one.